Cholesterol Drugs: In Wider Use

March 19th, 2012
A major study judging the benefits of cholesterol-lowering drugs in people with normal cholesterol has hit print, generating a new round of speculation about the proper use of these drugs, called statins. Read the rest of this entry »
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Raloxifene Helps Bones While Lowering Cholesterol

December 13th, 2011

A new study demonstrates that raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), protects against osteoporosis, while also reducing the blood level of “bad” LDL cholesterol.

A group of researchers from Indiana University, working in collaboration with scientists at Eli Lilly, the drug company which patented and markets raloxifene, published their study in the Dec. 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. Read the rest of this entry »

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Paxil Effective for Treating Depression in Adolescents

July 7th, 2011

Adolescents suffering from major depression were helped more by paroxetine (Paxil) than by another antidepressant, imipramine, or placebo, according to a study which will appear in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Combining Therapies Intelligently

December 24th, 2010

Although medical consumers enthusiastically embrace a wide array of therapies, from natural medicine to psychotherapy, they often feel that they are on their own when it’s time to add to conventional care. Most medical doctors seem ill at ease with alternatives or frankly admit to knowing little about them. Patients may be reluctant to turn to their primary care providers for advice. On the other hand, consumers know that they need to exercise good judgment when they choose practitioners and remedies from complementary sources. They understand that drugs and herbs can work at cross purposes and they are willing to research the various ways to combine kinds of care that are easily available, regulated, or well-known with those that are not. Here are a few tips for adding complementary therapies to your medical care in an intelligent way:
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Cardiovascular Disease and Nutrition: An Overview

June 28th, 2010

Cardiovascular disease, you have heard the term before. It is one of the most well-known and well-publicized conditions today, and with good reason. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the No. 1 killer in the U.S. Deaths from this disease in 2007 were more than 720,000, and according to the Center For Disease Control 21 million cases are reported annually.

However, did you know that CVD is actually a term used to indicate a collection of conditions or risk factors that have a detrimental effect on the heart and vascular system? These risk factors or conditions associated with CVD include; elevated blood pressure, cholesterol, blood homocysteine levels, blood lipoproteins levels, diabetes and free radical damage. Sounds a little more complicated now than just cholesterol levels, doesn’t it?
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Clinical Methods for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

June 9th, 2010

It was a scientist named Leonard Hayflick who discovered that most normal human cell types lose their ability to divide and ultimately die after undergoing a limited number of cell divisions.

Such cells contain no active telomerase, an enzyme required to maintain chromosome stability in dividing cells. Read the rest of this entry »

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Good for Diabetics– No More Needles?

May 12th, 2010

For people with diabetes, self-injections and pinpricks are part of a daily routine designed to regulate and monitor blood sugar levels. You can say goodbye to the needles.

Blood glucose is typically measured by pricking the finger with a small, but very sharp lancet several times each day to obtain blood samples. A small drop of blood is applied to a test strip, which is then inserted into a glucose meter that determines blood glucose levels. Monitoring blood glucose levels may seem like a simple procedure, but it is never a pleasant experience.
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Headaches when Quitting Smoking

April 15th, 2010

Headaches in smoking withdrawal, though not necessarily present, can be bothersome and last a few days. You may be surprised by some of the causes and remedies.

Smokers who strongly associated coffee with smoking may find themselves changing their coffee habit upon quitting smoking. Instead of drinking four, six or more coffees per day, they may decide to cut down when they quit, because of the strong association they made between smoking and drinking coffee. Others may decide that to quit smoking they have to cut out coffee altogether. Without realizing it, they thus may also initiate caffeine withdrawal. Headaches do accompany caffeine withdrawal for a few days.
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How to New Medications Move from Inception to Market

March 31st, 2010

Examination of the method by which a newly developed drug moves from inception to market.

After a drug has been developed in a laboratory, it must undergo many strictly controlled tests before it can be sold to the public at large. It can only be considered for human trials after it has been proven through preclinical trials that it can be beneficial.
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Kinky Sex

March 11th, 2010

Kinky Sex (for People with Kinks)
Let’s face it: arthritis is not an aphrodisiac. Pain, stiffness, poor self-image and unresolved conflicts with our partners can lead to a kind of enforced celibacy that leaves us feeling more isolated than ever. But with a little patience, a little love and a lot of creativity, we can regain our sexual selves and rekindle our relationships…
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